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Traditional Repair Followed by TTA Surgery – Dash

Dash (65 lb Pit/Mix) blew out her CCL during a romp in Oct. 2014 at the dog beach. She was running like a maniac (hence her name) and all of a sudden she came up lame. We called the vet who told us to give it a few days before bringing her in. Within 4 days, her other leg went out. We brought her to the vet, who told us that both CCLs were torn, but that they could only repair one at a time. Surgery was scheduled for the following day.

traditional repair and ttaThe vet performed a traditional repair (lateral suture). We weren’t informed of the type of surgery she was getting, or even that there was more than one way to repair a torn CCL. We adore our vet, but in this regard we’re concerned that she might have let us down.

Recovery was horrible to watch, but Dash came through it like a champ! She was toe touching by day 3 and able to support herself to go potty by day 2 (although mostly using her front legs as she literally didn’t have a good hind leg). Four weeks after surgery, we made our move from California to New York City, and the search for an orthopedic surgeon to repair her other leg began.

We found a great vet in our neighborhood, and after 6 weeks (now 10 weeks post op), she felt it was time for Dash to have a consult with the orthopedic surgeon. The consult was this past Wednesday, and the surgeon recommended the TTA procedure based on Dash’s size and weight. She also noticed some sideways movement in the repaired leg and warned us that in time, the repair is unlikely to hold up.

Traditional Repair Followed by TTA Surgery

Surgery is scheduled for 1/16, and unlike her first surgery where we took her home the same day, she has to spend 2 nights in the hospital which breaks my heart. The surgeon also told us not to feel “prepared” based on our experience with the lateral suture, because the TTA is much more invasive, with more bruising, swelling, and pain.

Any advice on TTA repair and/or recovery would be greatly appreciated.

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11 Responses to Traditional Repair Followed by TTA Surgery – Dash

  1. July 27, 2015 at 11:57 am #

    The lateral suture technique can work for large dogs under the right circumstances. Jasmine (our late Rottie) had it done on both knees and worked great. However, the fact that your vet didn’t inform you of all available options is inexcusable. There are a number options out there, actually, The suture technique, tightrope technique, TTA, TPLO and TTO. Each has its pros and cons. It is important to have all the options laid out so one can make an informed decision.

  2. July 30, 2015 at 12:23 am #

    We were in the same situation but or vet did not recommend tplo becuase he said for a pit it wont last he also recommended doth both at same time and even gave us a discount if we did it that way, day 15 and he is doing great.

    • August 17, 2016 at 6:31 pm #

      Jim, who is your surgeon. I have a pit also with bilateral ACL tears.

  3. August 4, 2015 at 11:45 am #

    Saw that you had the TTA done when you moved to NYC – who was your orthopedic surgeon? I’m looking for one myself, and we have similar pups. How is Dash doing now?

  4. August 4, 2015 at 12:52 pm #

    Hello Rachel , Im in California, end of week 3 for my dog, he is doing great and started to get small leash walks 10 minutes or so, range of motion exercises also. One more week in the kennel i made for him in front of my couch, both him and i are counting the day lol.

  5. May 24, 2016 at 8:23 am #

    We are dropping out Pit/Retriever mix off at Fairfield NJ, Dr. Chris Hunt for TTA surgery. I am so nervous… I am praying she does REALLY well.

    Keep us in your prayers, my Delilah Bear!

    • June 28, 2016 at 7:20 am #

      Prayers for you Delilah Bear. How is she doing?

  6. June 26, 2016 at 6:40 pm #

    My 6 month old had the proceedure. Walking 80% on foot the same day. The containment part sucks but pain and bruising wasn’t bad at all.

  7. June 28, 2016 at 7:18 am #

    We dropped off our lab this morning for TPLO surgery. She had surgery 1 1/2 years ago on left knee, now it’s the right one. On her left knee, she had the lateral suture stabilization, so I’m nervous for this surgery today. She is such a large active dog, keeping her calm is the most difficult part of the recovery. It just makes me so nervous because I don’t want to do anything wrong and hurt her. Prayers for our Coco and her recovery.

  8. June 29, 2016 at 9:33 pm #

    Glad to read about the surgery successes but I am still not convinced that surgery is the answer. I have a 4 year old 15lb little girl Pomeranian. She recently tore her ligament and the Vet after viewing the X-rays was quick to recommend surgery. We had a smaller Pom who passed away about 2 years ago and we had both knees repaired thru surgery and utimately the surgery created issues for the better knee and eventually caused issues for the so called good knee. I am concerned the surgery success is not extremely high for this surgery. Because of Chianti’s smaller size I read that “conservative management, using a brace, medication, therapy may be a non-surgical solution. Really conflicted on what to do, I want Chianti well, she is really sweet girl and no matter the situation I have never seen her snap or get upset with anyone including strangers.

  9. February 12, 2018 at 6:28 pm #

    Hello,

    I’m scheduled to have my pitbull mix 60pounds get surgery this Thursday. She tore her right hind leg 2 years ago and had the TPLO. She is doing well after surgery. But now she completely ruptured her left hind leg and will have the TTA surgery. I can’t find to much information about it. So of someone has had their dog undergo the TTA surgery please give me your input on it.

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