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Simitri Stable in Stride®

What is Simitri Stable in Stride®?

The Simitri Stable in Stride® surgical procedure is a minimally invasive technique that uses a three-part modular implant to immediately and continuously stabilize a knee joint that is unstable due to a cranial or caudal cruciate ligament tear. Unlike other surgical procedures, there are no muscles or bones cut during the procedure.

Read More: Is Simitri Stable in Stride “Right” For My Dog?

Basic Overview of How Simitri Stable in Stride® is Performed

 

The Simitri Stable in Stride® surgery begins by making a 12 cm (4 inch) skin incision centered over the inside of the knee.  A small 10-15 mm (½ inch) incision is made into the joint. The veterinary surgeon is then able to examine and assess the joint and remove only the torn tissues (cruciate ligament and damaged meniscus).  No meniscal release procedures are performed.

When the damaged tissues have been removed, the joint is closed. An incision is made in the fascia (tissue between muscle groups) to expose the end femur (thigh bone). Based on measurements taken from preoperative x-rays, the femoral plate is positioned and fixed in place with three locking screws.  The tibial plate then engages the femoral plate, it is positioned over the tibia (shin bone) and fixed in place using three locking screws. The soft tissues and skin are then closed.

Learn More: How Simitri Stable in Stride® is Performed 

Simitri Stable in Stride® Recovery Time

 

98% of all dogs that have undergone the Simitri Stable in Stride® surgical procedure were weight bearing within 24 hours of surgery. All dogs were consistently weight bearing within 48 hours. A comprehensive home care handout consisting of instructions for massage, passive range of motion, and controlled leash walking accompanies all patients when they are discharged from the hospital.  They are expected to go for a short controlled walk the day they arrive home. Generally, dogs recover within 4 months.

Estimated Cost of Simitri Stable in Stride®

 

While the cost for the Simitri Stable in Stride® surgical procedure varies, you can generally expect the cost to be comparable to either TPLO or TTA.

The actual cost can vary depending on a number of factors including:

  • Size and age of your dog – the amount and type of medications and supplies may vary based on body weight and age.
  • Geographic Location – Veterinary hospitals and clinics within major cities tend to be more expensive than smaller veterinary offices.
  • Type of Veterinary Facility – Veterinary universities and smaller clinics typically charge less than orthopedic specialty clinics
  • What is Included – Are you paying ONLY for the surgery, or are post-operative x-rays, visits and medications included?

Additional Information on Simitri Stable in Stride®

The Simitri Stable in Stride® surgical procedure provides immediate and continuous translational and rotational stability regardless of the phase of stride or position of the stifle. Knee joint movement (kinematics) are minimally affected and knee joint geometry is not altered.

Read Owner Experiences

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Post Surgery Questions – Lucy

Lucy is a 6-year-old Lab/hound mix who recently had a complete tear in her left hind knee and a partial in the right. Her first surgery is scheduled in 3 days. I have had both back and neck surgeries and helping her walk has been dehabiliting for me. I have no one to help. My […]

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TPLO Surgery Story – Bennett

Late November 2016 My family and I (all 8 of us: 3 kids, 3 dogs, my husband, and I) were enjoying a movie in bed one Friday evening when all of a sudden we noticed our 6-month-old yellow Lab, Bennett, limping on his hind leg. We assumed his leg had fallen asleep so I took […]

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TPLO Recovery – Cora

Around the end of April, I noticed a limp. Suddenly. I thought she had pulled a muscle, so I waited a couple of days. It didn’t go away, so off to the vet she went. They did an exam and determined she had a partial tear (maybe) in her CCL. Pain meds were prescribed for […]

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Conservative Management and Supplements – Duke

Hello to all! I have a Golden Retriever (Peyton) and a black Lab mix (Duke). In May of 2015, as we were preparing for my sons graduation from high school and heading to college, Duke and Peyton were playing in the backyard when Duke came in limping on his back left leg. With college on […]