TPLO Complications

For both humans and animals alike, any surgical procedure carries a risk of complications. You dog should have a full evaluation done, complete with blood work and other baseline testing, prior to surgery to help minimize any risks; this pre-surgical testing can often diminish the risk of death from anesthesia. Overall, complications with cruciate surgery…

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What Happens if a CCL Rupture is Not Repaired?

Surgical intervention for cranial cruciate ligament repair can be a costly and time-intensive process. The procedure can range anywhere from $800 to $2500 plus, depending on which surgical technique is used.  Your dog will also need to be on a number of medications including sedatives, antibiotics, and anti inflammatories.  Owners must place their pets under…

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Conservative Management in Cranial Cruciate Injuries

Conservative management is a non-surgical option for treating cranial cruciate injuries in dogs. Depending on the size of your dog, the severity of the injury and the duration of time since the onset of the CCL damage, your veterinarian may suggest CM in lieu of surgical intervention. Conservative management is focused around three basic principles:…

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Surgical Repair Options for Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair

For dogs diagnosed with cranial cruciate ligament tears or ruptures there are a number of non-surgical and surgical options available. Each dog is different, and your veterinarian will take into consideration your canine’s weight, size, overall health, severity of injury and the duration since onset when determining what treatment is best for your pet. Non-surgical…

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Drawer Sign Test and Tibial Compression Exam

If it is suspected that your dog has a cranial cruciate ligament tear or rupture, your veterinarian will perform a physical exam to determine whether or not this type of injury can be ruled out. This test involves manual manipulation of the knee joint and is referred to as the drawer test. Most dogs do…

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