CCL Injury in Both Back Legs

It is not unusual for dogs who have a cranial cruciate ligament rupture in one leg to develop one in the other leg. It is a little unusual to have two severe ruptures at the same time, but it does occur, especially in large breed dogs or overweight canines. Generally the signs of this type…

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Preparing Your Home for a Post Operative Dog

Before bringing your dog home from CCL repair surgery, you will want to make sure everything is set before their arrival. If you have already been practicing CM (conservative management) prior to surgery, odds are your home is already adequately prepared for the return of your canine patient, but it is always better to be…

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Safety of Anti Inflammatory Medications, NSAIDs

What are NSAIDs? NSAID stands for non-steroidal anti inflammatory drugs. These medications are most often prescribed to dogs for pain, inflammation and to aid in fever reduction. NSAIDs are most commonly used for the symptomatic relief of arthritic pain in geriatric pets. Aspirin and ibuprofen are well-recognized human NSAIDs, and the Food and Drug Administration’s…

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When Can I Expect My Dog to Have a Bowel Movement After CCL Surgery?

Many dogs will not have a bowel movement for the first 4 to 5 days after surgery, so if your dog falls into this category, do not worry. There are a number of reasons why a dog will not have regular bowel movements after surgery including – fasting prior to surgery, not eating well during…

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Physical Therapy After CCL Repair

Each veterinarian seems to have their own theories regarding how soon physical therapy should be started after ccl surgery and what techniques work best. Other veterinary surgeons will write off physical therapy all together, preferring for the dog to remain quiet for the first 6-8 weeks after the repair, gradually returning to exercise. While it…

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What to Expect After CCL Surgery

Whether your dog has undergone a TTA, TPLO, Tightrope, or traditional extracapsular imbrication repair, the steps following surgery are generally the same. Whether your dog stays the night at the vet’s after surgery, or head home with you the day of the procedure, the first few days following the CCL repair should be dedicated to…

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Are CCL Injuries More Common in Certain Dog Breeds?

Cranial cruciate ligament tears and ruptures can happen to any dog (or cat, although it is not nearly as common), but there are certain risk factors that make particular breeds of dogs more susceptible to this type of damage. CCL injuries are one of the most common orthopedic injuries in dogs, and is the most…

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What If I Can Not Afford CCL Surgery?

Not all owners can afford the expensive surgery that cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) repair surgery typically requires. There is quite a range in prices depending on what procedure is recommended by your veterinarian for your dog’s knee repair and where you live. For example, a traditional repair can cost anywhere from $1000-2000+, whereas a TPLO…

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Does My Dog Need a Meniscus?

When there is a joint injury like a cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture, it is important for the vet to try to preserve the menisci to the greatest extent possible. Loss of all or part of a stifle’s meniscus has the potential to accelerate the breakdown of articular cartilage with resultant DJD (Degenerative Joint Disease)….

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What is a Meniscus?

It is common for dogs with cranial cruciate ligament damage to also have injury to the mensicus. Simply put, the meniscus is a secondary structure in the knee that helps to provide lubrication for the joint, while also functioning in shock absorption and weight bearing. The menisci (plural for meniscus) are pads between the bones…

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